Marine Mammal Center Likes the Look of Plyboo

Located in the Marin Headlands, just across the bay from San Francisco, the Marine Mammal Center is dedicated to the rescue and rehabilitation of marine mammals - primarily elephant seals, harbor seals and sea lions. 

Within the center lies a gift shop, which sells merchandise that helps finance the non-profit work of the center. Also the merchandise reminds the public of the center’s mission to preserve the ocean environment. 

Although the focus of the center is the mammals who live offshore, the Marine Mammal Center also cares about preserving the onshore environment, one of the reasons that they selected Plyboo edge grain amber plywood for the counters and shelves in their gift shop.  Not only are the countertops attractive - which always helps to sell merchandise - but also they are made with Forest Stewardship Council certified bamboo, one of the greenest materials available.

Our bamboo forests are grown on the twenty percent plan.  Every year we harvest twenty percent of the forest bamboo, and every year twenty percent grows back. Therefore, the forest canopy is relatively constant, which is good for the bamboo and the other plants and animals that dwell in the forest.   

The woody look of the bamboo has a natural, calming effect on visitors who come and go from the center. Children love visiting the center, and despite the best efforts of teachers and parents, they can be a little rambunctious. No matter.  Our bamboo is very durable, outlasting hundreds of school field trips and ready for hundreds more. 

Amber edge grain bamboo is made by laminating rectangular strips of bamboo.  The bamboo is heated, giving it a caramelized color.  You can see the knuckle of the bamboo, but the look is very subtle. If you really like the full appearance of bamboo, then flat grain is your ticket.  If you like a lighter color, than the non-caramelized might be your choice. Click below to see examples.

If you are interested in the good work of the Marine Mammal Center, you can visit them here:   http://www.marinemammalcenter.org/